Why you can’t read a newspaper in the US without a reader’s license

The US government is demanding that libraries around the country provide their users with the necessary licenses to read newspapers.

The National Security Agency is demanding all newspapers published in the country, which includes many newspapers published by local news outlets, with a license, to be able to read the news and articles published by those publications.

The NSA has been investigating newspapers since the publication of Edward Snowden’s NSA leaks in 2013.

The US Department of Justice is asking libraries to ensure that the documents they publish can be read by any person or entity in the United States without a license.

The agency’s latest demand comes after the New York Times reported last month that it had been working with the NSA to develop technology that would make it easier for journalists and other sources to access the information published by newspapers.

The news paper reported that it was not clear how the NSA planned to obtain that information.

The NSA declined to comment on the agency’s demands.

Last week, the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform sent letters to five libraries and one government agency requesting more information about the NSA’s requests for newspaper licenses.

The committee’s letter asked for the information from both libraries and agencies to understand the scope and extent of the government’s surveillance programs, and to ensure any future requests are narrowly tailored to the information the agency has.