‘I am a little scared’: A student’s story of how he and his fellow students found support amid tragedy

A senior at the University of Illinois, Champaign, had to cancel classes and move home for two months because of a traumatic brain injury, but his story has become a model for students at other universities across the country to speak out.

On Tuesday, students at the school, one of the most prestigious in the nation, voted to put their concerns into action by putting together a petition asking their representatives to include a provision that would allow them to use the hashtag #IamDrexel in their emails and social media posts.

The student, who goes by the pseudonym “Sophie,” told The Globe and Mail she had been diagnosed with the neurological condition known as focal cochlear implant syndrome.

Sophia, who was a sophomore at the university in 2013, said she was devastated by the loss of her family and the devastating loss of a classmate.

She and her classmates were invited to participate in a fundraiser, but were unable to participate due to logistical issues.

I was devastated that the fundraiser was going to be a fundraiser for the hospital. “

she recalled.”

I was devastated that the fundraiser was going to be a fundraiser for the hospital.

I wanted to be there and be part of that.

And the only way I was able to be was to do it myself.

“I wanted to get out there and speak my mind, and I was a little afraid.”

Sophies story has inspired others to speak up.

At the University the petition, which has been signed by more than 2,300 students, is the first in a series of efforts to get a larger number of students to participate.

“What I think is amazing is that students, even with this condition, can find a way to be able to come together and have a conversation about their experience and have it be something positive,” said Jessica Lutz, executive director of the University at Brockport.

The school said it will work with the students to find ways to include the hashtag in future emails and messages.””

It’s amazing that it’s taken this long to get it going.”

The school said it will work with the students to find ways to include the hashtag in future emails and messages.

“Our students and their families are our first line of defense,” said Mark Davenport, dean of students.

“If they are suffering, if they have issues, or if they need help, they should feel comfortable to come to us and talk to us.”

“We will work to ensure that the hashtag is included in emails and in our social media postings,” he said.

“We know it is important to students and the community that the campus community and the campus should feel safe and welcome.”

Snyder said that she hopes that more students will take the time to learn about the condition.

“This has helped a lot of other students in my life, and it has helped so many people,” she said.

“We’ve seen the impact on the campus, and we know there is a lot more we can do.”